The Current Lab

 

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Laurie M. Wilcox

I am a Professor in the Department of Psychology, and member of the Centre for Vision Research at York University, Toronto, Canada. I am also a member of the newly funded VISTA program and am cross-appointed to the graduate program in Biology. I completed my graduate degrees at the University of Western Ontario, and joined York University in 1996. In my basic research program, I use psychophysical methods to reveal properties of the neural mechanisms which underpin stereoscopic depth perception. A recurring theme in my basic research is the stereoscopic interpolation of surfaces and the impact of this on suprathreshold depth perception. I am also interested in how and when stereoscopic depth information is used in more complex environments (both virtual and physical). I also have a strong interest in industry collaboration and have a number of ongoing projects with companies (Qualcomm) and organizations (VESA, DRDC). 


Bob Hou

I am a senior research associate at The Wilcox Lab and keenly interested in helping people enjoy science and to make their life easier. 

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Jonathan Tong

My main research interest is in the fundamentals of spatial perception, primarily approaching this topic with psychophysics and computational modelling techniques.  I started my academic journey as a PhD student in the lab of Dr. Daniel Goldreich, at McMaster University, where I studied tactile spatial acuity with a focus on probabilistic (Bayesian) models of perception.  I continued to pursue my interests in Bayesian modelling of spatial perception in Hamburg, Germany (University of Hamburg) as a post-doc in the lab of Dr. Brigitte Röder, where I expanded my scope of research to include the combination of multiple sensory systems: visuo-tactile and audio-visual perception.  With an interest in further expanding my scope of research to include perception of depth and applications of spatial perception in technology, I recently joined the lab of Dr. Laurie Wilcox as a postdoctoral researcher. I will be studying the perception of depth, with stereopsis and other cues, in virtual environments.


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Aishwarya Sudhama

I am a Research Coordinator at The Wilcox Lab. Currently, I am working on a collaborative research project between York University and Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), with an aim to determine if binocular vision (stereopsis) provides an operational advantage for military aircrew. Prior to this I was working with Dr. Laurie Wilcox, Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA), and Qualcomm Inc, to determine whether compression algorithms are visually lossy when applied to challenging (HDR) imagery.


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Matthew Cutone

I’m a Ph.D. Student at The Wilcox Lab. I am investigating potential differences in shape perception and stereoacuity between physical and virtual viewing conditions. I aided in the development and construction of the Physical Stereo Robot (PSR); a precision system for studying depth perception using physical stimuli.


Brittney Hartle

I am a Ph.D. student at The Wilcox Lab. My current research focuses on the impact of perceived viewing distance on the accuracy of shape perception in virtual environments rendered in head-mounted display (HMD) systems relative to full-cue physical viewing environments. Given the potential of HMD systems as tools for vision science, clinical, and training applications, it is critical that content creators and users understand potential errors in shape perception due to constraints of human visual processing. I am also involved in a collaborative project between York University and Defence Research and Development Canada. This project focuses on the role of stereopsis and binocular vision on operational requirements for Canadian Air Force personnel and the identification of candidate tasks that depend on stereopsis


Jesse Whiteman

I am a Ph.D. student in The Wilcox Lab. I received an M.Sc. in Experimental Psychology from Memorial University and a B.A.(Honours) in Psychology (minor in biology) from the University of British Columbia. My research focuses on stereoscopic depth perception in virtual environments. Specifically, I examine how varying interpupillary distance influences tasks such as distance estimation and 3D shape perception.


Domenic Au

I have just finished an undergraduate degree in psychology at York University and am currently an incoming master's student at The Wilcox Lab. My undergraduate honours thesis project was supervised by Dr. Wilcox where I studied the motion silencing illusion using stimuli that changed in depth to determine if the motion silencing illusion is also a 3D phenomenon. I presented the findings of this project at the 48th Annual Ontario Psychology Undergraduate Conference. I am looking forward to studying stereoscopic vision during my master's.


Arleen Aksay

Arleen completed a B.A., (Bilingual, Hons. Psychology) from Glendon College of York University. She is currently pursuing an MA in psychology at the Wilcox Lab. She previously worked as a research assistant in the lab on image quality assessment experiments. Her current research focuses on disparity gradients and connectivity through depth across planes, despite violations of Panum's fusional area. 


Anna Danilova

I am an undergraduate NSERC student at The Wilcox Lab, pursuing a major in Biomedical Science and minor in Psychology. My project focuses on the effect of observer produced motion parallax on depth perception of virtual objects.


Youssef Guirguis

I am an undergraduate research assistant at the Wilcox lab. My interest is in how the visual system uses stereopsis to disambiguate images. More specifically, I am currently investigating the effects of convexity bias and image disparity on perceived image shape.


Sija Srikanthan

I am an undergraduate student working towards a major in Biology and minor in Psychology. Currently, I am working as a research assistant at the Wilcox Lab and doing an independent study under the supervision of Dr. Wilcox. The project I am working on examines the effect of orientation of physical stimuli on perceived depth estimates.